Space Exploration

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Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are blocked

Icebound detector reveals how ghostly neutrinos are blocked
Famously, neutrinos can zip through a million miles of lead without skipping a beat. Now, in a critical measurement that may one day help predict physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, an international team of researchers with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has shown how energised neutrinos can be stopped cold as they pass through the Earth.
23rd November 2017

Unique type of turbulence discovered in the Sun

Unique type of turbulence discovered in the Sun
In the outer atmosphere of the Sun a form of turbulence has been discovered that has always been considered impossible: the turbulence is not caused by colliding waves, but by waves moving into the same direction. With the discovery of this phenomenon – called ‘uniturbulence’ – a number of KU Leuven mathematicians have earned their place in the physics handbooks for future generations.
22nd November 2017

High tech cable harnesses for critical spaceflight applications

High tech cable harnesses for critical spaceflight applications
  EIS Electronics designs, manufactures and delivers precise, high tech electrical harnesses qualified for use in Aerospace and Defense applications. From major Airbus programmes and Ariane 5 launch vehicles to various satellites, military armoured vehicles, submarines and radar systems.
20th November 2017


A strange solar system visitor

A strange solar system visitor
A strange visitor, either asteroid or comet, zipping through our solar system at a high rate of speed is giving astronomers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to examine up close an object from somewhere else in our galaxy. “It’s a really rare object,” explains Ralf Kotulla, a University of Wisconsin–Madison astronomer who, with colleagues from UCLA and the NOAO, used the 3.5 meter WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, to take some of the first pictures of the solar system interloper.
17th November 2017

Mars 2020 mission will test supersonic parachute

Mars 2020 mission will test supersonic parachute
A NASA Mars rover mission set to launch in 2020 will rely on a special parachute to slow the spacecraft down as it enters the Martian atmosphere at over 12,000 mph (5.4 kilometers per second). Preparations for this mission have provided, for the first time, dramatic video of the parachute opening at supersonic speed. The Mars 2020 mission will seek signs of ancient Martian life by investigating evidence in place and by caching drilled samples of Martian rocks for potential future return to Earth.
15th November 2017

Astronomers discover a type of cosmic explosion

Astronomers discover a type of cosmic explosion
  An international team of astronomers, including a University of Southampton expert, has discovered a type of explosion in a distant galaxy. The explosion, called PS1-10adi, seems to prefer active galaxies that house supermassive black holes consuming the gas and material around them.
15th November 2017

Upgraded mirror coatings improve gravitational wave detectors

Upgraded mirror coatings improve gravitational wave detectors
Stanford scientists will lead a national cooperative effort, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration Center for Coatings Research, to improve detection of gravitational waves at the twin LIGO facilities. LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, has a problem of scale: galaxy-shaking events like the recent collision of two neutron stars happened so far away that the echoes took 130 million years to travel to our planet. A collision of black holes detected in 2015 was even farther, 1.3 billion light years away.
9th November 2017

Physical model explains the origin of Earth’s water

Physical model explains the origin of Earth’s water
Equipped with Newton’s law of universal gravitation (published in Principia 330 years ago) and powerful computational resources (used to apply the law to more than 10,000 interacting bodies), a young Brazilian researcher and his former postdoctoral supervisor have just proposed a new physical model to explain the origin of water on Earth and the other Earth-like objects in the Solar System.
8th November 2017

Studying invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar system

Studying invisible magnetic bubbles in outer solar system
Space may seem empty, but it's actually a dynamic place populated with near-invisible matter, and dominated by forces, in particular those created by magnetic fields. Magnetospheres - the magnetic fields around most planets - exist throughout our solar system. They deflect high-energy, charged particles called cosmic rays that are spewed out by the Sun or come from interstellar space. Along with atmospheres, they happen to protect the planets' surfaces from this harmful radiation.
3rd November 2017

NASA scientists search for exoplanet atmospheres

NASA scientists search for exoplanet atmospheres
Some exoplanets shine brighter than others in the search for life beyond the solar system. NASA research proposes a novel approach to sniffing out exoplanet atmospheres. It takes advantage of frequent stellar storms—which hurl huge clouds of stellar material and radiation into space—from cool, young dwarf stars to highlight signs of habitable exoplanets.
3rd November 2017


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