Space Exploration

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Cosmic opportunity for radiation research at ESA

Cosmic opportunity for radiation research at ESA
Cosmic radiation is considered the main health hazard to human spaceflight and space exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond, which is why ESA has made cosmic radiation a focus of its research programme. Radiation poses a risk to the human body in the form of cancer, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular problems and tissue degeneration.
17th August 2017

Tracking the solar eruption through the solar system

Animation visualising the propagation of a coronal mass ejection leaving the Sun on 14th October 2014 and highlighting the speed at which it reached various spacecraft over the following days, weeks and months (not to scale).
16th August 2017

Adaptive optics facility improves sharpness of MUSE images

Adaptive optics facility improves sharpness of MUSE images
The Unit Telescope 4 (Yepun) of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) has now been transformed into a fully adaptive telescope. After more than a decade of planning, construction and testing, the new Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) has seen first light with the instrument MUSE, capturing amazingly sharp views of planetary nebulae and galaxies. The coupling of the AOF and MUSE forms one of the most advanced and powerful technological systems ever built for ground-based astronomy.
15th August 2017


The implications of cosmic silence

The implications of cosmic silence
Daniel Whitmire, a retired astrophysicist who teaches mathematics at the University of Arkansas, once thought the cosmic silence indicated we as a species lagged far behind. "I taught astronomy for 37 years," said Whitmire. "I used to tell my students that by statistics, we have to be the dumbest guys in the galaxy. After all we have only been technological for about 100 years while other civilizations could be more technologically advanced than us by millions or billions of years."
11th August 2017

Astronomy video game wins National People’s Choice Award

Astronomy video game wins National People’s Choice Award
'At Play in the Cosmos', an educational video game developed at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, is the winner of the Third Annual Mashable + Games for Change People’s Choice Award. The educational resource for introductory college astronomy received the highest number of online votes among the 11 games nominated in the category. Gear Learning, part of the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research, developed the game in partnership with publisher W.W. Norton & Company.
11th August 2017

Observations reveal Crab Nebula's polarised emissions

Observations reveal Crab Nebula's polarised emissions
Since it was first observed little more than a thousand years ago, the Crab Nebula has been studied by generations of astronomers. Yet new observations by researchers at KTH show this “cosmic lighthouse” has yet to give up all of its secrets. The researchers' observations of polarised X-rays from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar, published in Scientific Reports, may help explain sudden flares in the Crab’s X-ray intensity, as well as provide new data for modeling – and understanding – the nebula.
10th August 2017

Artificial eclipse will help image extrasolar planets

Artificial eclipse will help image extrasolar planets
In our hunt for Earth-like planets and extraterrestrial life, we’ve found thousands of exoplanets orbiting stars other than our sun. The caveat is that most of these planets have been detected using indirect methods. Similar to how a person can’t look at anything too close to the sun, current telescopes can’t observe potential Earth-like planets because they are too close to the stars they orbit, which are about 10 billion times brighter than the planets that surround them.
7th August 2017

Researchers detect exoplanet with stratosphere

Researchers detect exoplanet with stratosphere
Scientists have found compelling evidence for a stratosphere on an enormous planet outside our solar system. The planet's stratosphere-a layer of atmosphere where temperature increases with higher altitudes-is hot enough to boil iron. WASP-121b, located approximately 900 light years from Earth, is a gas giant exoplanet commonly referred to as a "hot Jupiter."
3rd August 2017

James Webb Space Telescope completes GSEG-1 test

James Webb Space Telescope completes GSEG-1 test
NASA called, and the Webb telescope responded. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope recently completed its Ground Segment Test Number 1 (GSEG-1), for the first time confirming successful end-to-end communication between the telescope and its mission operations center. GSEG-1, which completed on June 20, tested all of the communications systems required to support the telescope's launch, commissioning and normal operations once it is in orbit.
1st August 2017

Instrumentation allows simultaneous 3D view of galaxies

Instrumentation allows simultaneous 3D view of galaxies
For many years astronomers have struggled to get good-quality 3D data of galaxies. Although this technique is very powerful as it allows researchers to “dissect” objects, this was a slow process as each galaxy had to be observed independently. Novel Australian designed and built instrumentation called the “Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field” (SAMI) unit at the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) now allows astronomers to simultaneously view many galaxies at the same time.
31st July 2017


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DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London
Defence Communications 2017
26th September 2017
Poland Krakow
Military Airlift 2017
26th September 2017
United Kingdom London
Defence Exports 2017
27th September 2017
Italy Rome
Naval Damage Control 2017
3rd October 2017
United Kingdom Portsmouth