Space Exploration

Displaying 1 - 10 of 139

Juno Mission reveals a whole new Jupiter

Juno Mission reveals a whole new Jupiter
Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.
26th May 2017

Instrument to search for life in outer solar system

Instrument to search for life in outer solar system
An instrument originally developed to search for organic molecules on Mars is being repurposed to potentially hunt for life on a handful of moons in the outer solar system that appear to host oceans, geysers and vents of ice volcanoes. Will Brinckerhoff, a NASA scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, helped build a mass spectrometer for the European Space Agency’s 2020 ExoMars Rover mission.
24th May 2017

Simulations help reveal the history of the galaxy

Simulations help reveal the history of the galaxy
Thousands of processors, terabytes of data, and months of computing time have helped a group of researchers in Germany create some of the largest and highest resolution simulations ever made of galaxies like our Milky Way. Led by Dr Robert Grand of the Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, the work of the Auriga Project appears in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
24th May 2017


Medicine scholars conduct research on China's first cargo spacecraft

Medicine scholars conduct research on China's first cargo spacecraft
  The School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) is conducting a space life science study on board China's first cargo spacecraft, Tianzhou-1, which was launched last month. HKBU is the only higher education institution from outside of Mainland to conduct a scientific research project onboard Tianzhou-1.
23rd May 2017

Radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life

Radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life
  In the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes. To address this cosmic possibility, a University of Texas at San Antonio and Southwest Research Institute team modeled a natural water-cracking process called radiolysis.
23rd May 2017

Latest gravitational wave characteristics uncovered

Latest gravitational wave characteristics uncovered
Monash researchers have identified a concept - 'orphan memory' - which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves. The research, by the Monash Centre for Astrophysics, was published recently in Physical Review Letters. Einstein's theory of general relativity predicts that cataclysmic cosmic explosions stretch the fabric of spacetime. The stretching of spacetime is called 'gravitational waves.'
22nd May 2017

Wickless pulsating heatpipe systems in space

Wickless pulsating heatpipe systems in space
Developed by Aavid Thermalloy´s Italian Design Centre in conjunction with the European Space Agency, REXUS Pulsating Heatpipe System has been launched from the Esrange Space Centre in Kiruna, North Sweden. It´s one of two prototypes manufactured for the INWIP Project (Innovative Wickless Heat Pipe Systems) in order to study the behaviour of a Pulsating Heatpipe System in micro-gravity conditions.
19th May 2017

Human activity may affect space weather

Human activity may affect space weather
Our Cold War history is now offering scientists a chance to better understand the complex space system that surrounds us. Space weather - which can include changes in Earth's magnetic environment - are usually triggered by the sun's activity, but recently declassified data on high-altitude nuclear explosion tests have provided a look at the mechansisms that set off perturbations in that magnetic system.
18th May 2017

FADO: tool reconstructs the history of galaxies

FADO: tool reconstructs the history of galaxies
FADO is a new analysis tool developed by Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) astronomers Jean Michel Gomes and Polychronis Papaderos, which uses light emitted by both stars and ionised gas in a galaxy to reconstruct its formation history by means of genetic algorithms. This tool was presented in a recent article, accepted for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
17th May 2017

AX J1910.7+0917 found to be the slowest X-ray pulsar

AX J1910.7+0917 found to be the slowest X-ray pulsar
European astronomers have found that an X-ray pulsar designated AX J1910.7+0917 has the slowest spin period among other objects in this class. The research team, led by Lara Sidoli of the National Institute for Astrophysics and Space Physics (INAF) in Milan, Italy, presented the new findings in a paper published on arXiv.org. X-ray pulsars are sources displaying strict periodic variations in X-ray intensity, consisting of a magnetised neutron star in orbit with a normal stellar companion.
15th May 2017


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Future Surface Fleet 2017
6th June 2017
United Kingdom Portsmouth
Electronic Warfare Europe 2017
6th June 2017
United Kingdom Olympia, London
Close Air Support 2017
7th June 2017
United Kingdom London
UK Aerospace and Defence Forum 2017
20th June 2017
United Kingdom Royal Berkshire Conference Centre
DSEI 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom ExCeL, London