Space Exploration

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A model for three types of extreme-energy space particles

A model for three types of extreme-energy space particles
New model connects the origins of very high-energy neutrinos, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and high-energy gamma rays with black-hole jets embedded in their environments. One of the biggest mysteries in astroparticle physics has been the origins of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, very high-energy neutrinos, and high-energy gamma rays. Now, a new theoretical model reveals that they all could be shot out into space after cosmic rays are accelerated by powerful jets from supermassive black holes.
23rd January 2018

Studying middle-aged Sun by tracking motion of mercury

Studying middle-aged Sun by tracking motion of mercury
Like the waistband of a couch potato in midlife, the orbits of planets in our solar system are expanding. It happens because the Sun’s gravitational grip gradually weakens as our star ages and loses mass. Now, a team of NASA and MIT scientists has indirectly measured this mass loss and other solar parameters by looking at changes in Mercury’s orbit. The new values improve upon earlier predictions by reducing the amount of uncertainty.
22nd January 2018

Powering up human reach for the Red Planet

Powering up human reach for the Red Planet
NASA and its partners will host a news conference at noon EST (9 a.m. PST) Thursday, 18th January, at the National Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas, to discuss a recent experiment involving a new power source that could provide the safe, efficient and plentiful energy needed for future robotic and human space exploration missions. Audio of the news conference and presentation slides will stream live on NASA’s website.
17th January 2018


How do we take space debris out of orbit?

Don’t be scared of space debris. ESA’s Clean Space initiative is carrying out preparatory activities to build a test mission to take a single, large and heavy item of debris out of orbit.
12th January 2018

Exoplanet Explorers discover five-planet system

Exoplanet Explorers discover five-planet system
In its search for exoplanets, NASA's Kepler telescope trails behind Earth, measuring the brightness of stars that may potentially host planets. The instrument identifies potential planets around other stars by looking for dips in the brightness of the stars that occur when planets cross in front of, or transit, them. Typically, computer programs flag the stars with these brightness dips, then astronomers look at each one and decide whether or not they truly could host a planet candidate.
12th January 2018

Space... clean and untouched?

The ESA’s Clean Space initiative works hard to keep space safe and clean for future generations. Its three main objectives are presented in this video.
11th January 2018

Pulsars could hide planets hosting alien life

Pulsars could hide planets hosting alien life
It is theoretically possible that habitable planets exist around pulsars - spinning neutron stars that emit short, quick pulses of radiation. According to research, such planets must have an enormous atmosphere that converts the deadly x-rays and high energy particles of the pulsar into heat. The results, from astronomers at the University of Cambridge and Leiden University, are reported in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
20th December 2017

Discovering the eighth planet circling distant star

Our solar system now is tied for most number of planets around a single star, with the recent discovery of an eighth planet circling Kepler-90, a Sun-like star 2,545 light years from Earth. 
15th December 2017

Advancing accuracy over 20 years

Advancing accuracy over 20 years
The Galileo global navigation satellite system is raining down its signals across the globe, two decades since it was first conceived. One of the few European‑based manufacturers of GNSS receiver chips, u-blox, also twenty years old this year, has been closely keeping pace with Galileo’s development through their joint history.
15th December 2017

Mars mission investigates habitability of distant planets

Mars mission investigates habitability of distant planets
How long might a rocky, Mars-like planet be habitable if it were orbiting a red dwarf star? It's a complex question but one that NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission can help answer. "The MAVEN mission tells us that Mars lost substantial amounts of its atmosphere over time, changing the planet's habitability," said David Brain, a MAVEN co-investigator and a professor at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder.
14th December 2017


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23rd April 2018
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