Space Exploration

Displaying 161 - 170 of 234

Rare meteorites challenge understanding of the solar system

Rare meteorites challenge understanding of the solar system
Researchers have discovered minerals from 43 meteorites that landed on Earth 470 million years ago. More than half of the mineral grains are from meteorites completely unknown or very rare in today’s meteorite flow. These findings mean that we will probably need to revise our current understanding of the history and development of the solar system.
24th January 2017

Vital component helps search for earth-like planets

Vital component helps search for earth-like planets
Researchers at Uppsala University plan to manufacture a type of coronagraph for the VLT, the Very Large Telescope in Chile. The coronagraph is a key component of the telescope which will be used to search for planets in the neighbouring star system Alpha Centauri. The Uppsala researchers’ participation is a result of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) signing a deal with Breakthrough Initiatives for adapting the instrument of the VLT.
23rd January 2017

Online course on spaceflight draws upon personal experience

Online course on spaceflight draws upon personal experience
An online course led by Sweden’s history-making astronaut Christer Fuglesang is offering students the chance to learn from a personal perspective on space travel, and earn a certificate. Human Spaceflight: An Introduction is a massive open online course (MOOC) from KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The five-week programme begins on Monday January 23; free enrolment via edX is open to students and professionals worldwide.
19th January 2017


A tale of two pulsars' tails

A tale of two pulsars' tails
In two studies, international teams of astronomers suggest that recent images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of two pulsars—Geminga and B0355+54—may help shine a light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as well as their often perplexing geometry. Pulsars are a type of neutron star that are born in supernova explosions when massive stars collapse.
18th January 2017

Mapping the skies for Earth-like exoplanets

Mapping the skies for Earth-like exoplanets
EU-funded scientists have helped to confirm the existence of Earth-like exoplanets and issued weather reports from planets 1 000 light years away. It is worth remembering every now and again just how special our home planet truly is. Thanks to its solid outer crust and its propitious position at a distance from the sun where liquid water can exist, it is – and as far as we know uniquely - capable of supporting life.
17th January 2017

Hall-effect sensors used for Mars Rover robotic arm

Hall-effect sensors used for Mars Rover robotic arm
TT Electronics has announced that its sensors will be used in the NASA mission to the planet Mars in 2020. The robustness of the company’s Hall-effect sensors enables them to withstand the harsh environments found on Mars. The Hall-effect sensors from TT Electronics are key components in NASA’s new Mars 2020 Rover that will be landing on the surface of the red planet in 2021.
11th January 2017

Astronauts upgrade station with latest batteries

Astronauts upgrade station with latest batteries
Spacewalking astronauts hooked up batteries Friday on the International Space Station's sprawling power grid. NASA reported that all three lithium-ion batteries were up and running, a successful start to the space agency's long-term effort to upgrade the aging solar power system. Before venturing out, Commander Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson got a hand from a robot that took care of most of the grunt work—Dextre, a hulking machine with 11-foot arms.
9th January 2017

NASA selects Psyche and Lucy as Discovery missions

NASA selects Psyche and Lucy as Discovery missions
The Psyche mission, a journey to a metal asteroid, has been selected for flight under NASA’s Discovery Program, a series of lower-cost, highly focused robotic space missions that are exploring the solar system. Psyche includes prominent roles for Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) professors Maria Zuber (leading the Gravity investigation), Richard Binzel (asteroid composition expert), and Benjamin Weiss (leading the Magnetometer investigation).
6th January 2017

Glass plates enable discovery of the birth of black holes

Glass plates enable discovery of the birth of black holes
The University of Leicester is providing a type of X-ray mirror to the French space agency, CNES, for the Chinese-French satellite ‘SVOM’ which is designed to discover and study Gamma-Ray Bursts from newly formed black holes. SVOM will be launched into orbit in 2021. The mirror will become part of the X-ray telescope, which is essential in precisely locating these new discoveries.
12th December 2016

Our 'technosphere' now weighs 30 trillion tonnes

Our 'technosphere' now weighs 30 trillion tonnes
An international team led by University of Leicester geologists has made the first estimate of the sheer size of the physical structure of the planet’s technosphere – suggesting that its mass approximates to an enormous 30 trillion tonnes. The technosphere is comprised of all of the structures that humans have constructed to keep them alive on the planet.
1st December 2016


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